Posts Tagged ‘upper school’

CCO public domain image from Pixabay.

So, I’m still thinking about my observations. The other day I wrote about my experience in the math department in particular. This time, I’m thinking about the students.

At this point, I have observed a lot of classes. Even though I meet afterward with the teachers, I often think about the students. There are plenty of students whom I know by name or grade, but whom I do not teach or have never taught. For these students, I have vague impressions based on things like how they walk down the hall, how loud they are in the library, who they sit with at lunch. None of these is anything on which to base even a guess as to what they are like in class. And yet, don’t we all make those kinds of guesses all the time?

Seeing these students whom I don’t know as students in class has been so interesting. Since I am observing rather than teaching, I can really look around and see that big picture. Yes, so-and-so is not good at sitting still and talks out of turn, but is also on topic and engaged, while walking across the back of the room to switch chairs. Someone else who slouches through the day, trailing papers, once settled sits up and is focussed.

Now that I am mostly an administrator, I only teach a relatively few number of students in my English and Digital Fabrication classes, and even those students I see in only one learning environment. I try to make sense of the whole person by putting together the pieces I see in class with what I see around school and what I learn from other teachers. I try to go to one extra event that each of my students does during the semester (a game, a concert, whatever).

However, the vast majority of students I don’t teach, and therefore don’t see doing the most school-ish thing—learning in class. It’s strange to think that for a lot of students, I know the least about them as students. When I was a lower school, teacher and taught in a self-contained classroom, I knew all of my students so well; we spent all day together, went to recess together, went to lunch together, got ready to go home together. That leaves a mark. And, even though I had only one section of 5th grade, I had enough interaction with the other sections and teachers to know all of the 5th graders pretty well. For most of the students that I have now observed in class, I have seen a more studious version of the person I see in the hallways, a more lively person than I see in the library. It’s been wonderful to see all of these people as learners and members of an academic community.

Plus, the way schedule crumbled meant that I got to see several students in multiple classes purely by accident. I enjoyed seeing the same student interact with different content, with different classroom environments, with different teacher strategies. I got to see what part of the student was consistent across all those classes and what part changed, just like I used to see with my 5th graders.

More wins for me.

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