Posts Tagged ‘loose pieces’

So, I’ve been thinking about contour line drawings. It’s fall and that is what my personal kids were dong in art class; so, that is what I did as well. The other thing I have been thinking about a lot is layering. At the moment, I just don’t seem to think any of my art is finished if there is just one layer.

A colleague of mine was relating a conversation between two former students. One asked the other why he always worked abstractly or something like that. He replied (and this part I do have correctly) that he “couldn’t hide behind brushstroke” like she could. This led the good-brushstroker to reconsider the other student’s opinion and even seek it out when it came to composition in particular. This little story really got me thinking.

First of all, I really relate to the one student’s recognition that brushstroke (or technical ability to represent what is in front of you) was not his area of expertise. I used to have more ability in the brushstroke department, but as it turns out if you don’t practice, you not only don’t get better, you do a little backsliding. Shocking, I know. The fact that I can see this change in technical proficiency does not make me feel good and probably contributes to why I have trouble even calling the things I make art. It’s so easy to see the expression of that skill, and therefore it’s easy to be impressed by it. While I could with practice get back some of that skill, it is just not something I have enough time for at the moment. I’ll get to it. That’s where the layering comes in. Taking bits and pieces of other works or images or whatnot and combining them is a way of working with which I can experiment. I can put pieces together, move them around, move them again, try something else, all in a reasonable time and, if I don’t glue anything, I can put it down and look again a few days later. Lots of actual drawing or painting I can’t do.

For these images (part of my ongoing taxonomy work where I try to make 5 images in a series), I started with those contour line drawings of chairs on music score paper, kept with my Audubon birds theme (preferably in a totally different scale), and added some other this and that. Also, I cannot say enough how much the self-imposed 5 images requirement is a catalyst.

Here we go. In no particular order, this is what I made.

Very basic in a lot of ways. I like the different scales of the chair (which is a kid-size chair) and the bird.

 

 

Maybe the garden image on the right doesn’t work–wrong size, too dark? The bird and chair combo works for me.

 

This one also includes a woodblock print. The chair got a little too washed out. The blue stripe on the right seemed too dark, so I added some thin paper over it to tone it down.

 

I thought there needed to be something significant on the left, and so I added a print of a cabbage, which extends the size of the image. Not sure about that. I do like the birds in the tree/cabbage.

 

The bark paper on top of the image around the chair works for me. Not sure if there needs to be something else here too.

So there you have it. Conour line drawing of chairs, birds, music, and other spare parts.

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So, I’ve been thinking about weaving and my ongoing taxonomy project. (I started these sets of works after hearing a colleague talk about her MFA program assignment in which she made 10 sets of 10 works. I am going with sets of 5 and using the term ‘works’ very loosely.) My most recent set of works for my taxonomy project was weaving with sticks and yarn. At the end of my post about it, I thought about doing something with words next as I have been doing quite a bit with blackout poetry this past year. And, that is what I did. I combined weaving, blackout poetry, sewing, and some loose pieces (stamps) to create this set of works.

Each image is a combination of facing pages torn from The Adventures of Ulysses by Bernard Evslin. I have a very hard time destroying books, but I am getting better at it. The first tear is the hardest. This particular book was not in good shape, pages taped it, very discolored, etc. Anyway, I started with a page of text and cut each line part, keeping the very left hand side uncut. Then I found other paper, brown craft paper, music score, magazine images, and patterned paper, and cut a similar sized rectangle with wide vertical strips. I wove these together. That was step one.

For step two I decided to take the facing page and make a blackout poem.

The next step was creating dome sort of unified image with both pages and some other bits and pieces. I have a lot of Greek stamps, so I got those out first. Since I had heavy white paper as my background I thought about painting some of the backgrounds. However, in the end I didn’t like most of the painted backgrounds and swapped them out. The light water color colors were not working for most of the images.

Finally, I sewed on top of everything. Sometimes the sewing related to the words or image, other times it did not.

Now for the images.


This is one of the images that started out with a watercolor background. I think the white is much better, especially with the red stitching, which I did with a sewing machine.


The music score makes the right hand side very busy, but the poem side is minimal. I had another watercolor background that I decided not to use for this one. I like the free form swirls on on both sides. I had a stamp that I was going to put on, but I forgot and decided that it is fine without it, for the moment anyway.


I wanted muted colors for sleep, hence the gray edge and blue stitching. The image on the stamps seem sort of dreamy. The image on the right has a picture of kids on one of those swing rides at an amusement park.


This is the only image where I like the pastel softness. The last line of the poem reads, “she did not flinch.” So, I like the combination of the lily on the stamp, the lavender stitching, and the strong words. The image woven into the text is a woman standing next to a battered boat, which I thought was particularly good since the books pages were from the Circe chapter.


This one has the most going on. Between the patterned paper on the weaving page, the multicolored background, the writing, the stamp (the ‘and yet’ part come to life as the men return to fighting) and the sewing, there’s a lot to take in. And yet, (ha!) I don’t find it overwhelming. I really like how the yellow swirling stitching connects the two sides of the image.

What a great way to spend a staycation day.