More interview don’ts 

Posted: April 2, 2017 in Uncategorized
Tags: , , , ,

So, I’m still thinking about interview don’ts from the other day and “binders full of women”. This is another ‘taxonomy project’/art post; I’m ready to share the second set of images.

This set has many similarities to the first set. As before, all begin with an image of a man with a bag. I removed the background and put in decorative paper again, cut out a hole in the bag for a slide to be inserted and lit from behind. This time, I covered the image in vellum on which I had written out entire passages from two of the articles about the experiences many women have in the interview and job evaluation process. I stitched through all layers to outline the figure and in some cases sewed around the edges in addition.

The first one has a good combination of color that is visible through the vellum. I am pleased with the red in the pants, the background paper, and the bow in the girl’s hair. The border works too. Some of the later images don’t have borders, mostly just because of how the original image was designed, but I made try adding some. I think they may really need some.

“My First Interview” Slide: “Girl with a Watering Can” by Renoir 1876. National Gallery, Washington, DC.

The same article’s text continues in this next image. I only cut out the couch portion of the background. The sitting pose is not working so well here. However, again the border is a help, I think.

“Different Interview, Same Problem” Slide: “Ginevre de’Benci” by Leonardo da Vinci. National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC.

Finally, this tall, thin image. There was more to it, but it spanned two facing pages in a magazine and I couldn’t manage that. This one also needs a border on the bottom and right sides. The stitching around the guy works here, I think, as does the simliar pose in the woman in the slide and the guy. Also, the coloring or the clothing is visible. It gets kind of muddy towards the bottom, but I think the green and white background paper works better here than in the second image. (This is another “bag added” image.)

“The Assumption” Slide” “Judith” bu Giorgione” The Hermitage, St. Petersburg.

The next two images are all connected by the article’s text, which continues from one image to the next. I think the first image is best of the three. The man’s clothing has a little going on and the color is strong enough to be visible through the vellum and writing. Also, the thread and background paper colors are working well together. I found a slide where the tilt of the woman’s head is similar to the man’s.

“Attention Hiring Managers” Slide: “Portrait of a Young Girl” by Correggio c. 1515. Lowe Art Museum, Coral Gables, Florida.

The background paper in this next image is striking, when not behind the vellum. I liked the ‘big sky’ effect in comparison to the guy sitting on the ground. However, the black and white image of the guy disappears too much. The subtlety of the grays is lost. Plus with no border at all, there is something missing for me. I was contemplating sewing along some of the swooping in the background. I still may add that, after I sit with it for a bit. (Note, I had to add a bag into this one.)

“It Gets Worse” Slide: “Portrait of a Lady” by Vittore Carpaccio ca 1500.

I am a fan of incorporating sewing, embroidery, any kind of needle work into images. Given the focus on women, the addition of sewing can provide another layer to consider in terms of the expectations of what women should be doing or be good at.

While the other set of images seem to me to be more about the individual interviewer and his questions, these are more about the evidence of this being a pattern that many, many women encounter. For me, the flow of the words across the top of the image suggest that ongoing, overwhelming aspect of the problem. I also managed to take better pictures this time.

Any favorites? What about this format compared to the other?

 

Notes:

  • Source articles for text
  • Slides from a sale of Art History department slides from several local colleges.
  • Original ads from NYTimes T Magazine and FT Weekend/How to Spend It magazine.
  • I still love spring break.
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