Interview don’ts

Posted: March 27, 2017 in Uncategorized
Tags: , , , ,

So, I’ve been thinking about how women are treated in the wide world. In particular, I’ve been thinking about mansplaining and career inequalities that begin in the hiring process. I remembered the “binders full of women” comment from some years ago too. Time for another taxonomy project (where I make a set of 5 images).

This set of five images combines advertising images from magazines, patterned papers, art history slides, and actual text from articles reporting on questions women have been asked in interviews. Like “fashion don’ts” from fashion magazines, I have covered the eyes of the men to make them unrecognizable, or maybe universal? The men are all white. That’s what I found in the advertisements in the Sunday newspaper magazines I had, and given the images coming out of Washington these days of groups of white men making decisions for all sorts of people who are not exclusively white men, seems sort of appropriate.

Anyway, here’s how I went about this. I started with the entire advertisement, cut out the background, put in a new, abstract pattern, cut a hole for the woman’s portrait (slide) in the bag the man is carrying, and added text. I also added a light behind the slide to show it off. In the final image you can see that without the light, it is just a plain, dark area.

Here’s my first final piece.

“What will you do, Anna?” Slide: Anna Parolini Guiccinardini by Carracci, 1598.

I like the wavy pattern to the paper on this one. The face is not so dark in person. Bad lighting on this photo.

“So, being a woman…” Slide: Woman Nursing a Baby, by Pieter de Hooch. SF Fine Art Museum

I have two different women/slides in this image. Not sure which one I like better yet.

“More makeup, please, lady.” Slide: Portrait of a lady c. 1519 by Corregio. St. Petersburg, The Hermitage.

“More makeup, please, woman.” Slide: Portrait of a woman by Miereveld. National Gallery, London.

This one needed something else. So, I added the string. I think it totally works with the color and pattern of the paper and provides an edge.

“What does your husband think?” Slide: Portrait of a Young Boy (!) by Rosalba Carriera c. 1725. Academia, Venice. I think it is a great twist that this image of a boy, who could pass for a young woman, is in fact by a woman.

My final image didn’t include a bag. It turns out there are only so many images of men with bags. So, I had to add the tablet case under the arm. I kept some of the door and cut out the center panels only. I like the spacey look here.

“What does your husband think, gentlewoman?” Slide: Portrait of a Gentlewoman by Prospero Fontana c. 1565. Museo Davia Bargellini, Bologna.

Here it is without the light on to give you an idea of what they all look like when not “on.”

At the moment, I am trying to decide if I want them to be finished as is or if I will incorporate the idea of a binder from the “binder full of women” idea. I am playing with the idea of having some binder or folder that covers the image and then when opened, triggers the light to go on.

My photographs really leave a lot to be desired here. The light in the slide makes it hard to get a good image and good balance, so sorry about that. Any favorites or ones that you don’t think work at all?

 

 

Notes:

  • Source articles for quotes
  • Slides from a sale of Art History department slides from several local colleges.
  • Original ads from NYTimes T Magazine and FT Weekend/How to Spend It magazines.
  • I have another entire set of 5 with a slightly different look that I’m working on now. I love spring break.
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